Sasha Bikoff Creates Thematic Richness

Sasha Bikoff creates thematic richness at Currey & Company
Sasha Bikoff in our High Point showroom during Fall 2019 Market surrounded by her thematic richness.

New York-based designer Sasha Bikoff, who you may remember created a dazzling altered universe filled with an array of colors in our High Point showroom in Fall 2019, has some kicky new products in our Spring 2020 lineup. Her backdrop last October contained sensual experiences as varied as the morning sunrise in the Mediterranean Sea and a midnight enchanted forest, and her new collection of lighting and furniture is sprinkled with pops of color and thematic richness. 

The Thematic Richness of Sasha Bikoff

A vignette with Sasha Bikoff’s talent for thematic richness from our High Point showroom in Fall 2019.
A vignette with Sasha Bikoff’s talent for thematic richness from our High Point showroom in Fall 2019.

Sasha began her career at Chelsea’s Gagosian Gallery before establishing her own firm, Sasha Bikoff Interior Design. Her design debut—an apartment in the famed Dakota—inspired The New York Timesto dub her the “interior designer for the young & wealthy” and the New York Post to call her the “go-to decorator for Manhattan’s well-heeled millennial set.” Sasha’s design aesthetic is broad: she has created products and projects that intermingle influences as diverse as 18th century French Rococo, 1960s Space Age Modern, 1970s French Modernism, and 1980s Italian Memphis Milano with colorful fabrics and rare antiques. Regardless of the starting point, her thematic point of view is always avant-garde. For our new products, Sasha’s muse was Miami Modern, or MiMo as they call it down south. 

The Hibiscus family of products, designed by Sasha Bikoff for Currey & Company.
The Hibiscus family of products, designed by Sasha Bikoff for Currey & Company.

The iconic motifs she referenced were inspired by the sunny climate, gritty boldness, and casual glamour of South Florida’s coastline. Not only did she call to mind the vintage architecture of Miami Beach and the tropical lushness of the flora, she thought of the wide array of celebrities who had made the Beach famous—from Frank Sinatra and the Rat Pack to Miami Vice and Al Pacino’s portrayal of Scarface. 

The Fontainebleau’s arches dotted with cheese holes express the thematic richness of Morris Lapidus.
The Fontainebleau’s arches dotted with cheese holes designed by Morris Lapidus, which inspired Sasha’s Lapidus designs.

Sasha felt we were the perfect collaborator to bring her ideas to life: “The company historically has been a brand that has designed unique and whimsical pieces inspired by elements of nature and antiquities. The creativity of the brand has always resonated with me and when the opportunity arose to be a part of the Currey family, I felt like it was a match made in heaven.” Our president, Brownlee Currey says: “Sasha brings to Currey & Company a youthful re-imagining of our products and we are all tremendously excited about what she might do with the company.” 

New Releases by Sasha Bikoff

The Lapidus Two-Tiered Chandelier, designed by Sasha Bikoff for Currey & Company.
The Lapidus Two-Tiered Chandelier. 

One family of products among her new designs references a vibrant time in the history of Miami Beach when luxury hotels were being built on the sandy shores. Offered in a wall sconce, chandelier, two-tiered chandelier, pendant, large pendant, and table lamp, the Lapidus was inspired by one of the most iconic buildings on the Beach, the famed Fontainebleau designed by Morris Lapidus during the 1950s. This family of fixtures, which mimics the shape of the arches and the cheese-hole pattern ornamenting the resort, is made of wrought iron in a sugar white finish.

The Miami Beach Pendant, designed by Sasha Bikoff for Currey & Company.
The Miami Beach Pendant.

Sasha says her Miami Beach family of fixtures, which includes a wall sconce, a pendant, and an interior accessory, was inspired by a 1980s Miami Vice vibe: “I keyed in on the colors, the nature, and the Deco revival architecture that is unique to the South Florida locale.” The curvy products have blush pink accents that echo Art Deco style at its finest. 

The Hibiscus Chandelier, designed by Sasha Bikoff for Currey & Company.
The Hibiscus Chandelier.

The tropical floral side of Miami Beach inspired the Hibiscus family in our Sasha Bikoff Collection. “It’s my favorite flower,” says the designer of the motif we’ve created from wrought iron in a mix of glossy white, pink, and green finishes. The line includes floral accent and drinks tables, a wall sconce, a pendant, a chandelier, a petit chandelier, and a large chandelier—each of which will introduce whimsy to a space. 

The Creative Oasis

The interiors of the Fontainebleau include a spiral staircase and the famous bow tie floor, both expressions of Morris Lapidus’ thematic genius.
The interiors of the Fontainebleau include a spiral staircase and the famous bow tie floor, both expressions of Morris Lapidus’ thematic genius. 

Sasha believes the rooms she designs represent more than just living spaces, each eclectic environment is a creative oasis she will turn over to her clients. This point of view is so in sync with the architect who inspired her Lapidus family of lights, who also knew a thing or two about thematic richness. In his autobiography Too Much is Never Enough, he tells the story about working with Ben Novak, the developer of the Fontainebleau. “Ben was a hotelier to his very fingertips,” he wrote. “He knew hotel operations as few men do. But it went deeper than that. He knew what he liked, and, as I was to learn later, what his guests liked.” 

The Fontainebleau in 1955 when it was newly finished.
The Fontainebleau in 1955 when it was newly finished. 

Lapidus took Novak’s directives and informed them with the theories he had developed as a designer of retail stores to achieve the storied building, one of only a handful of hotels on the Beach that still bear the original architect’s thumb prints today. Echoing Sasha’s desire to give her clients inspiring spaces, he wrote, “If I had reached people through their basic emotions and love of color and drama in my stores, I could do the same in my hotel design.” And so he did. We proudly include this lauded architect’s name in our lineup of new Spring products, and we have Sasha Bikoff to thank for that!

Morris Lapidus at the Fontainebleau in his signature bow tie: “The white marble floor is decorated with black marble bows. This was the only signature that I placed in the hotel. I have worn only bow ties all my adult life.”
Morris Lapidus at the Fontainebleau in his signature bow tie: “The white marble floor is decorated with black marble bows. This was the only signature that I placed in the hotel. I have worn only bow ties all my adult life.” 

Ending on a lyrical note today, Lapidus penned this heartfelt narrative as he looked back on his feelings when the Fontainebleau hotel was completed. “I walked out into the quiet gardens and looked back at the sweeping lines of the building that I had designed. Behind me were the beach and the restless ocean with its waves beating their runic rhythm as a sort of obbligato to music coming from the ballroom,” he wrote. “Until this moment, all of this had been mine, all mine. Now I felt like a parent saying his last goodbye to a child he had matured to manhood. The Fontainebleau belonged to my clients and the world now.”